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Sample sentences for the GRE study word beguile

beguile can be used as a verb

1.Nor delicatesse, I cannot beguile the time with talk. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
2.And often did beguile her of her tear. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.To beguile many and be beguiled by one. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
4.Who does beguile you Who does do you wron. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
5.But couch, ho here he comes to beguile tw. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
6.And so beguile thy sorrow, till the heaven. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.When misery could beguile the tyrant's rag. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.Thou dost beguile me Was this face the fac. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9.Reignier, is 't thou that thinkest to beguile m. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
10.And how she was beguiled and surpris'd. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
11.And pleasing conference beguiles the day. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
12.Hath thus beguiled your daughter of hersel. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
13.All time of pause, rudely beguiles our lip. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
14.And high and low beguiles the rich and poo. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
15.They beguiled the time by backbiting and intriguing against each other in a foolish kind of way. - from Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
16.Cruncher beguiled the earlier watches of the night with solitary pipes, and did not start upon his excursion until nearly one o'clock. - from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
17.by force How that beguiled was a carpentere, Paraventure in scorn, for I am on. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
18.Scrooge took his melancholy dinner in his usual melancholy tavern and having read all the newspapers, and beguiled the rest of the evening with his banker's-book, went home to bed. - from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

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