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Sample sentences for the GRE study word brim

brim can be used as a verb
brim can be used as a noun

1.With lips of love, and hearts of lovers fill'd to the brim with love. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
2.Bring me but to the very brim of it. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.It was pierced in the brim for a hat-securer, but the elastic was missing. - from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
4.'No wonder we couldn't move it--why it's full to the brim of old bits of brass. - from The Works of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe
5.With ample and brim fulness of his force. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
6.I was only ragging you The papers are full up to the brim with that type of thing. - from The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie
7.Ten zones of brass its ample brim surround. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
8.When Richard, with his eye brim full of tears. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9.There was a mouth under the eyes, the lipless brim of which quivered and panted, and dropped saliva. - from The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
10.These flat brims curled at the edge came in then. - from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
11.Above the brims they force their fiery wa. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
12.They wore round hats that rose to a small point a foot above their heads, with little bells around the brims that tinkled sweetly as they moved. - from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
13.The shaft into which the river hurls itself is an immense chasm, lined by glistening coal-black rock, and narrowing into a creaming, boiling pit of incalculable depth, which brims over and shoots the stream onward over its jagged lip. - from Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
14.He moved a doll's head to and fro, the brims of his Panama hat quivering, and began to chant in a quiet happy foolish voic. - from Ulysses by James Joyce

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