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Sample sentences for the GRE study word confound

confound can be used as a verb

1.You must not confound my meaning. - from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
2.So deep a malice, to confound the rac. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
3.It is a mistake to confound strangeness with mystery. - from A Study In Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
4.With the hush of my lips I wholly confound the skeptic. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
5."Only," said I, "that you would not confound them with the others. - from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
6."Surrender, you two and confound you for two wild beasts Come asunder. - from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
7.How often they dart out of themselves as if to confound me and mock m. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
8.So keen and greedy to confound a man. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9."Oh, do not confound the two, Eugenie.. - from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
10.My shame and guilt confounds me. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
11.And to glance with an eye or show a bean in its pod confounds th. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
12.Unseen, inquisitive, confounds himself. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
13.And in the taste confounds the appetite. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
14.To hideous winter and confounds him there. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
15.The strong he withers, and confounds the bol. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
16.And round his son confounds the warring hosts. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
17.That of Jonas Ramus, which is perhaps the most circumstantial of any, cannot impart the faintest conception either of the magnificence, or of the horror of the scene--or of the wild bewildering sense of _the novel_ which confounds the beholder. - from The Works of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe
18.He is apt to denominate, however, his whole gain, profit, and thus confounds rent with profit, at least in common language. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

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