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Sample sentences for the GRE study word default

default can be used as a verb
default can be used as a noun

1.All waits or goes by default till a strong being appear. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
2.Are penitent for your default to-day. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.In default of his assistance, it was necessary to be assured of his neutrality. - from Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
4.surely That never should there be default in her. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
5.The Sunday papers printed separate editions as further news came to hand, some even in default of it. - from The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
6.The bandage about the jaws was a silk handkerchief in which I had bound up my head, in default of my customary nightcap. - from The Works of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe
7.knowledge, that I may say in the default 'He is a man I know.. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.Kiouni--this was the name of the beast--could doubtless travel rapidly for a long time, and, in default of any other means of conveyance, Mr. - from Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
9.his default and when he it espied, Out of his doors anon he hath him digh. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
10.mistrust Though he the sooth of her defaulte wis. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
11.cleverly, skilfully That no defaulte no man apperceiv'd, But aye they wonder'd what she mighte be That in so poor array was for to see, And coude such honour and reverenc. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
12.Land of misease, because there be three manner of defaults against three things that folk of this world have in this present life that is to say, honours, delights, and riches. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
13.But, considering his own defaults and demerits, -- remembering the patience of Christ and the undeserved tribulations of the saints, the brevity of this life with all its trouble and sorrow, the discredit thrown on the wisdom and training o. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

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