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Sample sentences for the GRE study word demur

demur can be used as a verb
demur can be used as a noun

1.she urged him so strongly to remain, that he, who was gratifying the first wish of his own heart by a compliance, could not long even affect to demur especially as Mrs. - from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
2.This mandate, which had been delivered with great majesty, was obeyed without the slightest demur and Charlotte made the best of her way off with the packages while Noah held the door open and watched her out. - from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
3.His own possessions, safety, life, he would have hazarded for Lucie and her child, without a moment's demur but the great trust he held was not his own, and as to that business charge he was a strict man of business. - from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
4.She was demure about what she did. - from 2 B R 0 2 B by Kurt Vonnegut
5.She looked particularly small and demure this morning. - from The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie
6.Maria agreed with him and favoured him with demure nods and hems. - from Dubliners by James Joyce
7.To me should utter, with demure confidenc. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.There's never none of these demure boys com. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9."Ah by the bye," then sinking his voice, and looking demure for the moment--"I hope Mr. - from Emma by Jane Austen
10.Like her mother, she was plainly dressed unlike her, she had a pale, rather refined face, with a demure mouth and downcast eyes. - from The Best American Humorous Short Stories by Various
11."That's what maw said," returned the young woman, simply, yet with the faintest smile playing around her demure lips and downcast cheek. - from The Best American Humorous Short Stories by Various
12.Marilla had almost begun to despair of ever fashioning this waif of the world into her model little girl of demure manners and prim deportment. - from Anne Of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

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