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Sample sentences for the GRE study word emolument

emolument can be used as a noun

1.Added to which of course would be the pecuniary emolument by no means to be sneezed at, going hand in hand with his tuition fees. - from Ulysses by James Joyce
2.Holding the office directly from the crown, I believe, all the royal emoluments incident to the Cinque Port territories become by assignment his. - from Moby Dick; or The Whale by Herman Melville
3.The emoluments of offices, therefore, can, in most cases, very well bear to be taxed. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
4.In the different parliaments of France, the fees of court called epices and vacations constitute the far greater part of the emoluments of the judges. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
5.These different emoluments amount to a good deal more than what is necessary for paying the salaries of officers, and defraying the expense of management. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
6.This necessity is greatest with those to whom the emoluments of their profession are the only source from which they expect their fortune, or even their ordinary revenue and subsistence. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
7.In some universities, the salary makes but a part, and frequently but a small part, of the emoluments of the teacher, of which the greater part arises from the honoraries or fees of his pupils. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
8.The recompence of ingenious artists, and of men of liberal professions, I have endeavoured to show in the first book, necessarily keeps a certain proportion to the emoluments of inferior trades. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
9.The inferior office of justice of peace, though attended with a good deal of trouble, and in most cases with no emoluments at all, is an object of ambition to the greater part of our country gentlemen. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
10.The emoluments of offices are not, like those of trades and professions, regulated by the free competition of the market, and do not, therefore, always bear a just proportion to what the nature of the employment requires. - from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

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