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Sample sentences for the GRE study word hale

hale can be used as a adj
hale can be used as a verb
hale can be used as a noun

1.And hither hale that misbelieving Moo. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
2.Although ye hale me to a violent death. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.To hale thy vengeful waggon swift away. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
4.And hale him up and down all swearing i. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
5.Joseph was an elderly, nay, an old man very old, perhaps, though hale and sinewy. - from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
6.I think oxen and wainropes cannot hale the. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.I'll hale the Dauphin headlong from his thron. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.strange that sheep's guts should hale souls out of men's bodie. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9.Silvanus is represented as a hale old man, carrying a cypress-tree, for, according to Roman mythology, the transformation of the youth Cyparissus into the tree which bears his name was attributed to him. - from Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by E.M. Berens
10.Even like a man new haled from the rack. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
11.So hangs and lolls and weeps upon me so hales and pull. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
12.multitude The name of Henry the Fifth hales them to an hundre. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
13.Stephen haled his upended valise to the table and sat down to wait. - from Ulysses by James Joyce
14.I had cut my knuckles against the pale young gentleman's teeth, and I twisted my imagination into a thousand tangles, as I devised incredible ways of accounting for that damnatory circumstance when I should be haled before the Judges. - from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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