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Sample sentences for the GRE study word harbor

harbor can be used as a verb
harbor can be used as a noun

1.I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
2.There rode in the harbor the prince's ship, ready. - from English Literature by William J. Long
3.So much so, that now taking some alarm, the captain, making all sail, stood away for the nearest harbor among the islands, there to have his hull hove out and repaired. - from Moby Dick; or The Whale by Herman Melville
4."I said there were no fixed habitations on it, but I said also that it served sometimes as a harbor for smugglers.. - from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
5.Thirdly Some eighteen or twenty years ago Commodore J---, then commanding an American sloop-of-war of the first class, happened to be dining with a party of whaling captains, on board a Nantucket ship in the harbor of Oahu, Sandwich Islands. - from Moby Dick; or The Whale by Herman Melville
6.You had dreamed that a ship had entered the harbor at Havre, that this ship brought news that a payment we had looked upon as lost was going to be made. - from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
7.At ten o'clock the vessel cast anchor in the harbor of Dover, and at half past ten d'Artagnan placed his foot on English land, crying, "Here I am at last. - from The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
8.Why, look at one of them prisoners in the bottom dungeon of the Castle Deef, in the harbor of Marseilles, that dug himself out that way how long was HE at it, you reckon. - from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Complete by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
9.The boat they were in could not make a long voyage there was no vessel at anchor outside the harbor he thought, perhaps, they were going to leave him on some distant point. - from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
10.Go but to Portsmouth or Southampton, and you will find the harbors crowded with the yachts belonging to such of the English as can afford the expense, and have the same liking for this amusement. - from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, Pere

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