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Sample sentences for the GRE study word mantle

mantle can be used as a verb
mantle can be used as a noun

1.Saw you with spreading mantle covering the world. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
2.The mantle of Queen Hermione's he. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.Around him next the regal mantle threw. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
4.His purple mantle golden buckles join'd. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
5.And as she fled, her mantle she did fal. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
6.And, in his mantle muffling up his face. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.Around her next a heavenly mantle flow'd. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
8.Do cream and mantle like a standing pond. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9.But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
10.As many vests, as many mantles told. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
11.Then put my tires and mantles on him, whils. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
12.I' th' filthy mantled pool beyond your cell. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
13.trimmed at the borders And ev'ry knight of green ware mantles on. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
14._--That mantles the vista far and wide and wait till the glowing orb of the moon shine forth to irradiate her silver effulgence.... - from Ulysses by James Joyce
15.I, though my doubting were as manifest, As is through glass the hue that mantles it, In silence waited not for to my lips "What things are these. - from The Divine Comedy, Complete by Dante Alighieri
16.To take precedence over all in going to the evening service of the Church, or to festival meetings, to which it was the fashion to carry rich cloaks or mantles against the home- coming. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
17.a class of people Savage and wild of looking and of cheer, Their mantles and their clothes aye tearing And oft they were of Nature complaining, For they their members lacked, foot and hand, With visage wry, and blind, I understand. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

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