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Sample sentences for the GRE study word partition

partition can be used as a verb
partition can be used as a noun

1.Of this great Round partition firm and sure. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
2.And why, why is he interested in the partition of Poland. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
3.Petritsky went behind the partition and lay down on his bed. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
4.It is the wittiest partition that ever I hear. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
5."What a fool I am It's the partition cracking. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
6.He went to the door of the partition wall, raised his hands, and hummed in French, "There was a king in Thule.. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
7.In Petersburg Vronsky intended to arrange a partition of the land with his brother, while Anna meant to see her son. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
8.Equal partition abolishes emulation and consequently labor. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
9."It appears," he went on, with eager interest, "that Friedrich was not, after all, the person chiefly responsible for the partition of Poland. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
10.The partitions between the rooms are of the flimsiest nature. - from My Man Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse
11.And thin partitions do their bounds divid. - from English Literature by William J. Long
12."'The partitions between the cells of the convicts, instead of being of thick oak, as is usual in convict-ships, were quite thin and frail. - from Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
13.The keeper opens the two center partitions to examine the brood cells. - from War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
14.Despair is surrounded with fragile partitions which all open on either vice or crime. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
15.There are moments when hideous surmises assail us like a cohort of furies, and violently force the partitions of our brains. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
16.A sponge has no more partitions and ducts than the mound of earth for a circuit of six leagues round about, on which rests the great and ancient city. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo

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