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Sample sentences for the GRE study word peruse

peruse can be used as a verb

1.And peruse manifold objects, no two alike and every one good. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
2.When I peruse the conquer'd fame of heroes and the victories o. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
3.Consider, you who peruse me, whether I may not in unknown ways b. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
4.Madam, please you peruse this letter. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
5.March by us, that we may peruse the me. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
6.Come, go with me, peruse this as thou goes. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.Will not peruse the foils so that with ease. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.Out, some light horsemen, and peruse their wings. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9.In which the reader will peruse Two Verses which ar. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
10.This book I had again and again perused with delight. - from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
11.Mary perused it in silence, and returned it to her brother. - from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
12.I have perused it, own it is admirable, moving awhile among it. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
13.Leaves from you I glean, I write, to be perused best afterwards. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
14.As the first volume of a tale perused and laid away, and this the second. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
15."Has not Monsieur le Baron perused my letter. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
16."Has your majesty perused yesterday's report. - from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
17.Sitting on a low stool, a few yards from her arm-chair, I examined her figure I perused her features. - from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
18."We made the money up this morning, sir," said one of the men, submissively, while the other perused Mr. - from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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