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Sample sentences for the GRE study word relent

relent can be used as a verb

1.Undoubtedly he will relent and tur. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
2.O then at last relent is there no plac. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
3.I do relent what would thou more of ma. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
4.'Oh, you see, Nelly, he would not relent a moment to keep me out of the grave. - from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
5.'Tis time our fury should relent at las. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
6.And therefore yet relent and save my life. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.Not to relent is beastly, savage, devilish. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.But my husband has his weaknesses, and he is so weak as to relent towards this Doctor.. - from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
9.Not until Wendy again raised her arm did he relent sufficiently to say, "Well, not for ever, but for a whole week.. - from Peter Pan by James M. Barrie
10.washed with them, but relents not. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
11.provided contrivance He stirr'd the coales, till relente gan The wax against the fire, as every man, But he a fool be, knows well it must need. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
12.Qu relente es se rmese vuesa merced, que aqu le traemos armas ofensivas y defensivas, y salga a esa plaza, y sea nuestra gua y nuestro capitn, pues de derecho le toca el serlo, siendo nuestro gobernador. - from Don Quijote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
13.-Por Dios -respondi el husped-, que es gentil relente el que mi husped tiene, pues hele dicho que ni tengo pollas ni gallinas, y quiere que tenga huevos Discurra, si quisiere, por otras delicadezas, y djese de pedir gallinas. - from Don Quijote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
14.Meliboeus then relents admits that he is angry and cannot judge aright and puts himself wholly in her hands, promising to do just as she desires, and admitting that he is the more held to love and praise her, if she reproves him of his foll. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

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