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Sample sentences for the GRE study word sash

sash can be used as a
sash can be used as a verb

1.Pensive I sate me down there gentle slee. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
2.The Filial Power arriv'd, and sate him dow. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
3.Within the Gates of Hell sate Sin and Death. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
4.They sate them down to weep, nor onely Teare. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
5.Then stil at Hels dark threshold to have sate watch. - from Paradise Lost by John Milton
6.Will sate itself in a celestial be. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.The crowner hath sate on her, and finds it Christian burial. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
8.trade He was a well good wright, a carpentere This Reeve sate upon a right good stot. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
9.improve The minstrelsy, the service at the feast, The greate giftes to the most and least, The rich array of Theseus' palace, Nor who sate first or last upon the dais. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
10.He was sated his soul longed to wipe a spiritual mouth on the back of a spiritual hand, and have done. - from The Best American Humorous Short Stories by Various
11.Davy Byrne, sated after his yawn, said with tearwashed eye. - from Ulysses by James Joyce
12.when she is sated with his body, she will find the error of he. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
13.It was eleven when they got home, sated with dissipation, but with the exceeding sweet pleasure of talking it all over still to come. - from Anne Of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
14.During the four years since his puppyhood he had lived the life of a sated aristocrat he had a fine pride in himself, was even a trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of their insular situation. - from The Call of the Wild by Jack London
15.A false and dangerous situation, which sates public power or private misery, which sets the roots of the State in the sufferings of the individual. - from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
16.This beast, At whom thou criest, her way will suffer none To pass, and no less hindrance makes than death So bad and so accursed in her kind, That never sated is her ravenous will, Still after food more craving than before. - from The Divine Comedy, Complete by Dante Alighieri

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