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Sample sentences for the GRE study word shrew

shrew can be used as a noun

1.It was you as did for your shrew sister.. - from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
2.Is she so hot a shrew as she's reporte. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.Much more a shrew of thy impatient humour. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
4.I think thou hast the veriest shrew of all. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
5.By this reck'ning he is more shrew than she. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
6.To tame a shrew and charm her chattering tongue. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
7.If the shrew is worsted yet there remains to her woman's invisible weapon. - from Ulysses by James Joyce
8.Is Katharine the shrew illfavoured Hortensio calls her young and beautiful. - from Ulysses by James Joyce
9.Why should I you rehearse in special Her high malice she is a shrew at all. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
10.He looked back with his kindly, shrewd glance. - from The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie
11.Oh yes, you're a shrewd one at politics, I dare sa. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
12."If he is as shrewd as I think he is, consul, he will come.. - from Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
13.'No,' said the doctor, with a very shrewd and satisfied look. - from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
14.Jeeves is a tallish man, with one of those dark, shrewd faces. - from My Man Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse
15.thou be so shrewd of thy tongue. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
16.Ay, and a shrewd unhappy gallows too. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
17.He has a shrewd wit, I can tell you an. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
18.A shrewd contriver and you know his means. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare

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