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Sample sentences for the GRE study word troth

troth can be used as a noun

1."Plight me thy troth here in mine hand," quoth she. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
2.man, and his fins like arms Warm, o' my troth I do no. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
3.No, by my troth not so much as will serve to be prologue t. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
4.soul, i' faith, sir, by my troth he is, as ever broke bread bu. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
5.at variance For by my troth I will be to you both This is to say, yea, bothe fair and good. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
6."The servant of God, Konstantin, plights his troth to the servant of God, Ekaterina." And putting his big ring on Kitty's touchingly weak, pink little finger, the priest said the same thing. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
7."Soothly, daughter," quoth she, "this is the troth For knights should ever be persevering, To seek honour, without feintise or sloth. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
8."Save only this, by God and by my troth Troubled I was with slumber, sleep, and sloth This other night, and in a vision I saw a woman roamen up and down. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
9.also How loth her was to be a wicked wife, And that she lever had lost that day her life And that her troth she swore through innocence She ne'er erst had heard speak of apparenc. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
10.Ye shall your trothe holde, by my fay. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
11.rather Than that his wife were of her trothe false." The sorrow of Dorigen he told him als'. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
12.great thanks Each in the other's hand his trothe lay'th, For to be sworne brethren till they dey. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
13.I had rather be slain For very love which I to you have, But if ye should your trothe keep and save. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
14.fly And suddenly he loved this kite so, That all his love is clean from me y-go And hath his trothe falsed in this wise. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
15.I taughte this answer unto this knight, For which he plighted me his trothe there, The firste thing I would of him requere, He would it do, if it lay in his might. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
16.My trothe will I keep, I will not he." With hearte sore he went unto his coffer, And broughte gold unto this philosopher, The value of five hundred pound, I guess, And him beseeched, of his gentleness, To grant him dayes of the remenan. - from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

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