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Sample sentences for the GRE study word wring

wring can be used as a verb
wring can be used as a noun

1.And he'll not wring the last penny out. - from Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
2.I say, just wring out my jacket skirts, will ye Thank ye. - from Moby Dick; or The Whale by Herman Melville
3.You tempt him to wring them, till he forces a cry of humiliation.. - from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
4.But you are damp Let me wring you out. - from War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
5.The pangs that wring my flesh and bon. - from Faust by Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
6.'Oh, but I will wring your heart yet' he cried at the invisible wilderness. - from Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
7.Lady Ingram thought it "le cas" to wring her hands which she did accordingly. - from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
8.Rear up his body wring him by the nose. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
9.And wring the awful sceptre from his fist. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
10.'It wrings my heart to hear you. - from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
11.Cries, help O help and wrings her hands. - from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
12.Weeps over them and wrings his hapless hand. - from The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
13.He wrings his hands, he beats his manly breast. - from The Iliad of Homer by Homer
14.There's a white lady walks along the brook just about this time of the night and wrings her hands and utters wailing cries. - from Anne Of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
15.He wrings the utmost out of each experience so quickly and so completely that he is forever on the lookout for new worlds to conquer. - from How to Analyze People on Sight by Elsie Lincoln Benedict and Ralph Paine Benedict
16.'The mental agony I have suffered, during the last two days, wrings from me the avowal to you of a passion which, as you well know, is not one of yesterday, nor one I have lightly formed. - from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
17.Yet one doubt remains, That wrings me sorely, if I solve it not, Singly before it urg'd me, doubled now By thine opinion, when I couple that With one elsewhere declar'd, each strength'ning other. - from The Divine Comedy, Complete by Dante Alighieri
18.HIS jaws uplifting from their fell repast, That sinner wip'd them on the hairs o' th' head, Which he behind had mangled, then began "Thy will obeying, I call up afresh Sorrow past cure, which but to think of wrings My heart, or ere I tell on't. - from The Divine Comedy, Complete by Dante Alighieri

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